Outline of Paragraph on narration

How does Atwood use narration to create effects?

 

In Margaret Atwood’s novel The Handmaid’s Tale, Atwood uses non-chronological time sequences, Offred’s ambiguous reconstructed narration, as well as the Historical Notes to create a sense of confusion and suspense.

 

a)”I lie in bed, still trembling. You can wet the rim of a glass and run your finger around the rim and it will make a sound. This is what I feel like: this sound of glass. I feel like the word shatter. I want to be with someone. Lying in bed, with Luke, his hand on my rounded belly. The three of us, in bed, she kicking, turning over within me.”

b) “It’s impossible to say a thing exactly the way it was, because what you say can never be exact, you always have to leave something out, there are too many parts, sights, crosscurrents, nuances”

c) “Are there any questions?”

 

OIB Essay Practice No°2

  1. “Fiction depends for its life on place”, wrote Eudora Welty. Discuss the use and the significance of the setting in two OIB works.
  2. “The past is not a package one can lay away.” (Emily Dickinson) Explore how far this statement is true for characters from two works you have studied in OIB.
  3. As humans we create the story of who we are and then act in accordance with that story. Yet our narratives can be based on misinformation, misinterpretation, or even deliberate lies. Explore the effects of a character’s self-created story in two works you have studied in the OIB program.

A Separate Peace: Chapters 10, 11, 12, 13

Passages: the following passage might prove to be important. Re-read the sections with these passages and think about why they might be significant? What do they mean? What are important ideas, imagery, or words? How do they add to the story or a theme? Do they incorporate any literary devices?

While the group of boys lament over not having Leper in the assembly room to testify, Gene says, No one said anything. Phineas had been sitting motionless, leaning slightly forward, not far from the position in which we prayed at Devon. After a long time he turned and reluctantly looked at me. I did not return his look or move or speak. Then at last Finny straightened from this prayerful position slowly, as though it was painful for him. “Leper’s here,” he said in a voice so quiet, and with such quiet unconscious dignity, that he was suddenly terrifyingly strange to me.

Passages: the following passage might prove to be important. Re-read the sections with these passages and think about why they might be significant? What do they mean? What are important ideas, imagery, or words? How do they add to the story or a theme? Do they incorporate any literary devices?

As Gene sees the trucks coming to Devon, he says, “I thought the Jeeps looked noticeably uncomfortable from all the power they were not being allowed to use. There is no stage you comprehend better than the one you have just left, and as I watched the Jeeps almost asserting a wish to bounce up the side of Mount Washington at eighty miles an hour instead of rolling along this dull street, they reminded me, in a comical and a poignant way, of adolescents.”

 

“[I]t seemed clear that wars were not made by generations and their special stupidities, but that wars were made instead by something ignorant in the human heart.”

Thesis on Centrality of Human Relationships written in class

In Margaret Atwood’s novel The Handmaid’s Tale, Atwood illustrates the essential human need for love through Offred’s seeking out relationships, her sensitivity to the exchange of ideas, feelings and touch, as well as her desperate desire to trust. All of these cravings depict that love is required to survive a totalitarian regime that undermines any signs of affection in order to dehumanize and control its people.

T° EURO History – Totalitarian Regimes

A really good video about totalitarian regimes and how they arose during the period of the Great Depression is available here:

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Wednesday and Thursday 14th-16th October Lesson Resources

Overview of fascism in the UK during the 1930s:

Mosely Overview

Link to an excellent article about Mosely:

Meet Sir Oswald Mosley, The Aristocrat Who Nearly Turned Britain Toward Fascism Before World War 2

Film footage from 1936 about The Battle of Cable Street when thousands of East Londoners stood in the way of a fascist march:

Cable Street 80: newsreel

On this day in 1936, Oswald Mosley and the British Union of Fascists were blocked from marching through the streets of East London by the Jewish community and its allies.Today we commemorate The Battle of Cable Street and remember all those who stood in the way of fascism.

Posted by HOPE not hate on Wednesday, October 2, 2019

 

Oswald Mosley died in France in 1980 at 84 years old. To this day, Mosley’s fascist writings are available from far-right publishers. His charisma and reputation for elegant hatred were compelling enough that almost no changes were made to his character when he appeared as a villain in the fifth season of the British crime drama Peaky Blinders: